LOGO and natural language

Typographical conventions


The following typographical conventions have been followed in this coursebook to distinguish the different roles of words and phrases in the text. Your browser (even now) may not distinguish all of the HTML styles, but you should be able to set it up (if you do not like its defaults) to suit your own preferences:

Upper case

Upper case (the default in many implementations of the language) is used for any text displayed by LOGO. This may be:

E.g. YOU DO NOT SAY WHAT TO DO WITH DOG

HTML bold (<b>)

Bold is used for LOGO text - i.e. for LOGO instructions and expressions typed by the user at toplevel and for LOGO expressions used as examples in the text.

E.g. first last [bread jam]

HTML Pre-formatted (<pre>)

Pre-formatted monospaced is used for the definitions of LOGO procedures (and collections of LOGO procedures making up particular microworlds) which are provided as separate pages intended for downloading as text. In most cases such text is directly importable into a LOGO application.

E.g.

to ends.with? :list :end
if empty? :end [op "true] 
if empty? :list [op "false] 
if not ( last :list ) = ( last :end ) [op "false] 
op ends.with? bl :list bl :end 
end 

HTML Italic (<i>)

Italic is used for technical terms on their first appearance and for later occurrences of the same terms when it is appropriate to signal their special status.

E.g. primitive or instruction

HTML citation (<cite>)

Citation is used for natural language words and phrases, including English terms used informally to refer to programming notions.

E.g. The game Consequences . . .or The term expression was used loosely earlier . . .

HTML emphasis (<emph>)

Emphasis is used occasionally for emphasis (what else?) in the body of the text.

Ron Brasington
Department of Linguistic Science
The University of Reading
Reading
UK

E-mail: ron.brasington@rdg.ac.uk